Shotwell

Shotwell
** – Image is logo for Shotwell software.

Some may recall that sometime ago I had jumped into the Picasa as a photo organizer with both feet.  Of course, that was when Picasa, a Google product, had support for not only Windows and Macs, but Linux as well.  Granted, the support was  kludgy Wine based conversion that was pretty slow, but it worked and allowed it to be used on Linux with out the overhead of Windows.  Most anyone who is interested also probably knows that about a month (or maybe it has been two) Google announced that they would no longer be supporting Picasa on Linux going forward.  Much to my dismay, I had to search for something else as I rarely boot my desktop machine in Windows and even less does my laptop go there, but those are for other discussions. Continue reading “Shotwell”

Tobacco – Cutting

Tobacco CutI have new pictures from the morning of August 31 when they were starting to cut the field of tobacco that I have been doing a photo essay on for the last several weeks. It is nice that I actually got the hands doing the actual job, though I am not sure it truly shows enough. Again, a fond memory for me. I admit to having done a large amount of this kind of work as a teenager. Aside from putting in hay during the summer, actually cutting tobacco right before and even after school started was the best money-making time of my youth.

I admit that I was never super fast, cutting Continue reading “Tobacco – Cutting”

Tobacco: Revisited

Tobacco Topped, Barn in DistanceI liked the first ‘photo essay’ about tobacco so well, I have decided to follow through with an update with each major step in the tobacco process.  The change from exactly seven days is not much, as the only thing that has occurred is the blooms have been broken out in the lower 2/3 of the field.  This was actually done the day after I took the first photos and to help you blend locally, we would call that process topping.  Right after the tobacco was topped, it most likely sprayed with a chemical that retards new sprouts or buds from starting.  If not done, the tobacco would sucker out at the top leaf joints and spend all of its energy trying again to make seeds.  By application of the chemical spray the energy is instead spent on making the leaves that are present usually get larger, especially in width.  An effect of this application and the general turn toward the homestretch  is that bottom leaves Continue reading “Tobacco: Revisited”

Tobacco and Nostalgia

Pretty in Pink?I recall from a few years back reading a book, I think it was titled The Complete Agrarian Reader, matter of fact I have read certain parts of it a 2nd and 3rd time since then. Anyway, that is not the point – the introduction of that particular book was written by Barbara Kingsolver, of some amount of fame as an author. I have, strangely enough, not read anything else she has written – though I probably should. Anyway, in this introduction she speaks of being in college and having as fond memories the smells and sights of tobacco being harvested and being around the barns where it was curing with an unmistakable nostalgia – but yet a certain amount of shame over her own history and association with tobacco amongst her college friends.

I find a kindred spirit in what she has to say. Having grown up on a farm raising and working in tobacco, not to mention the countless hours that I spent working in tobacco for other farmers in the general area where I grew up. I find it funny that I spent 18 years Continue reading “Tobacco and Nostalgia”